Financial planning for parents with special needs children

On and off I’ve been hunting for resources that will help us to better prepare financially for Eli’s future.

I e-mailedf finance journalists (who ignored me) and searched online without any luck.

Looking back, though, it may have been more than a keyword problem.

I wasn’t using the search term “special needs” because I didn’t *actually* want to accept that Eli had any.

In the conversation where I officially learned Eli had CF, though my tears, I’d said that I didn’t want him to feel different. I didn’t want him to feel sick.

But he is different. And though he is fighting battles we can’t see, he still has to fight every day to keep his body healthy.

While keeping up with time-intensive care, managing medicines and doctor bills and, you know, everything else in life, it feels totally overwhelming to even contemplate what steps we might need to take or what help is already out there on the financial end.

Point is, reading random personal finance articles tonight I found a great organization that I plan to contact.

It is called the Special Needs Alliance. 

It’s just a start, but it’s better than what I had yesterday: nothin’.

Onward.

daily-life

Advertisements

Mark Twitter wars with Pioneer Woman, news crew visits house, mommy wears election headphones, newspaper hats: The week in review

What an odd week.

Continue reading Mark Twitter wars with Pioneer Woman, news crew visits house, mommy wears election headphones, newspaper hats: The week in review

Reader mailbag: 4 more tips to boost monthly savings

I’m dippin’ into the reader mailbag for today’s post. I have one of those? Why yes. Yes I do. In this day-late (but not a dollar short) post on savings and money, I wanted to share a few tips readers sent me after last week’s post on 5 things that have helped us save about 10 percent of our take-home income.

I got distracted yesterday and strayed from Monday morning money madness — with errands and Dancing with the Stars…Amber Riley for the win…

Mark and I are continuing to save. We’re also targeting waste in food and supplies. It’s hard. We feel like we’re already living minimally, down to the nitty gritty. But are we…really? I slipped up and threw down almost $5 on a pumpkin spice latte the other day. Busted! Savings fail. That’s the kind of stuff we’ve been trying to cut out. Things are stretched. We’ve got two young children, all the fees and extras that come with two young children, plus a pile of medical bills relate to Eli’s cystic fibrosis and two hospital stays and surgeries. So stuff like lunches out and coffees, which were no-brainer “I deserve it” purchases before we started taking a little time each week to think money, have *mostly* gone by the wayside in favor of more savings, with the occasional slip-up. I totally busted Mark for Taco Bell. HAHAHA. After September, I want to see if we *actually* improved our habits or if I’ve just been blowin’ smoke.

“What else might we try to save cash,?” I asked readers. Here are some of their responses:

Continue reading Reader mailbag: 4 more tips to boost monthly savings

Monday morning money madness: be like a squirrel girl

I kinda hate the title of this post. And I kinda love it.

All that alliteration…the nod to financial experts on cable that point at you and yell at you about financial matters…guh….I’m talking to you, Suze Orman. Stop. Yelling. At. Me.

For the past few Mondays I’ve been spending the mornings trying to get our financial life in order, against my natural tendency to avoid the subject as if it were, oh, I don’t know, a Cholera-infested corpse.

I’m not doing this because it’s cutesy, or popular to be frugal or to make funny little blog posts about my slumlord and our dead tree, etc…

 But seriously folks, isn't our dead tree beautiful this time of year?
But seriously folks, isn’t our dead tree beautiful this time of year?

Having Eli, a little baby with a chronic disease, has been transformative in every sense of the word.

The financial aspect of cystic fibrosis is daunting.

My friend Pam put it this way.

The disease, she said, “Is an expensive pain in the ass.”

No, she didn’t mean our little ones are pains in the asses — although just like any other child, ours is sure to be the source of the occasional headache…

Aren't I cute. I'm going to grow up and do naughty boy teenage stuff that makes mama coo coo. hehehehehe
Aren’t I cute. I’m going to grow up and do naughty boy teenage stuff that makes mama coo coo. hehehehehe

The disease is the expensive pain in the ass – the deadly disease that Eli didn’t ask for, Pam’s kids didn’t ask for, we didn’t ask for.

CF is a lifelong medical condition. It’s here to stay and we need to figure out a way to deal with its cost.

How much does cystic fibrosis actually cost?

Continue reading Monday morning money madness: be like a squirrel girl